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Coffee is one of the most popular beverages around the world. As you will know from reading our blogs, we like to keep you updated with what has been in the news recently… Most of us need caffeine to wake up in the morning, but some of us might have a caffeine intolerance, meaning we have to avoid it. If do you have an intolerance to caffeine or are not sure, then reading this may dismay you a bit. However, you do still need to know what the benefits of coffee are, as once you have completed an elimination diet, you can begin to consume the items that you were previously struggling with.

What does a caffeine intolerance mean?

A caffeine intolerance means that you potentially are missing out on a load of caffeine benefits, as laid out by Coffee Urban. If coffee was your favourite beverage but you found out that you have a caffeine intolerance, then you may be missing out on all its nutritional favours. We are not trying to panic you though. We realise how important caffeine might be to your diet and routine, so we want to help you manage it. Keep reading on to see how you should manage your intolerance.

An allergy to caffeine is different from an intolerance

At Sensitivity Check, we test for intolerances. This means that if you have a caffeine intolerance, we can help you to manage it and eventually introduce it back into your diet. It would mean living without coffee or energy drinks for six weeks but it would be worth it to avoid your symptoms. However, if it turns out that you have an allergy to caffeine, then this means you will have to find alternatives. It would be easier to find the alternatives to help make up for the fibre that you would miss out on from your diet.

However, when most people are asked what they miss about drinking coffee and caffeine, they say the buzz it gives them to wake up in the morning. A mid-afternoon coffee is also something that people do not like missing out on.

Want to know more about a coffee intolerance or what else Sensitivity Check tests for? Log on to www.sensitivitycheck.com and see how we can help.